Hair Rules

logo

 

I hesitate to post this because I think some writers should just have more sense.  NYmag.com recently profiled Anthony Dickey for their fashion blog, The Cut, and had this to say:

Even in a city as diverse as New York, women with textured hair need to search long and hard for a salon that can specialize in their hair, or one that has a token stylist who is able to work with it. Fortunately, hairstylist Anthony Dickey has a new salon called Hair Rules New York (named after his line of textured-hair-care products) that caters to all hair types, from nappy to silky. Having worked with everyone from Michelle Obama to Sarah Jessica Parker, Dickey (who already has a waiting list) and his staff are prepped for any hair challenge. We caught up with the lovable stylist while he was putting the final touches on his first salon (which opened earlier this month) and chatted about how he hates shampoo and why people call him Dickey.

dick

Credit: Melissa Hom

If you spotted the word(s) that helped raise the hairs on the back of my neck, you might feel me on this.  You can read the rest of the interview here. But nonetheless, it’s still a smidge exciting when a Salon opens up, particularly one that caters to the needs of a marginalized group…curly/coily/textured femmes!  Earlier this month Anthony Dickey, of the famed “Hair Rules” collection, opened a salon here in New York that seems to show some promise in terms of evening out the play-field, allowing more options  for those seeking to have their naturally textured hair played with.   According to Dickey, “It’s all about diversity. I’m for the kinkiest of the kink to the finest of white hairs that fall flat to the scalp. I’m for everything and everyone in between.”

 

before-1

after-1

If you’re in the NYC area:

Hair Rules New York, 828 Ninth Ave., nr. 54th St.; 212-315-2929

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Tags:

7 Comments to “Hair Rules”

  1. I’ve never tried anything by Hair Rules, but I’ve heard they’re EXTREMELY protein heavy and have mineral oil 😦 And some of his “kinky” models have texturizers in their after pictures @_@

    • I actually heard the same thing, which is why I kind of bypass it at the BSS. The ingredients in some of the products are on my ‘no..no’ list, but I do know others who’ve had amazing results! I’m really just glad the exposure of the new salon and it’s purpose will inspire others to cater to those with different textured hair. Each time I used to head to a salon, the first suggestion/idea they had was to blow dry my hair straight! In hindsight I think I was dooped because they really didn’t know how to care for my hair…lol

  2. I have to agree with ” Back to Curly ” I have found the same thing, most styles do just the basics. Its very difficult to find a great stylist these days.

  3. Did anyone else find the Before picture just as nice as the after?

    • I acutually thought the same thing! I’m really loving her fro…i think the after is still a nice look, but the model looks a bit more striking in the before shot

  4. I would rather that he said “Style 1/Style 2” because I do NOT see anything wrong with the before picture. At all.

  5. ironically, here in NYC, I see more of the ‘before’ ladies roaming the streets than the ‘after’ look ladies…both are great options to wear your hair, but yeah…’before’ looks more eye catching

%d bloggers like this: